Browse Prior Art Database

Two-Step Procedure to Intercept And Route Inbound Messages

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121123D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 3 page(s) / 169K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kistler, M: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a program design that allows a user to set up a trap dynamically for a specific inbound message and route it to a specific destination after its interception.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 37% of the total text.

Two-Step Procedure to Intercept And Route Inbound Messages

      Disclosed is a program design that allows a user to set
up a trap dynamically for a specific inbound message and route it to
a specific destination after its interception.

      Two verbs are defined:  REGISTER AND ACCEPT.  A user uses the
REGISTER verb to set up the trap dynamically for a specific message
and the ACCEPT verb to receive the intercepted message.  An intercept
indicator is defined which is set to n when REGISTER is received and
is reset to off when the message is intercepted.  This indicator
indicates that the next time the specific inbound message (as
specified in the REGISTER verb) arrives, it should be intercepted.  A
wait-post mechanism is designed to synchronize the interception of
the message and acceptance of the message by ACCEPT verb.  Since the
best way to understand the design is through an example, the complete
description of the design is provided in the example scenario below.

      This design is especially valuable when one wants to bypass a
scheduling system and wants to route a specific message to a
destination that can perform unique processing to this message.  The
two-verb approach provides much better usability.  By separating the
function of registering and accepting into two verbs, the user can
control the timing of the accept verb.  This gives the user
flexibility to set up the unique environment in the special
destination to process intercepted message.  In the case when the
user has to do something in order to initiate the inbound message,
the two-verb approach helps the user serialize these actions and
guarantees that the message will not be missed; that is, it allows
the user to synchronize the three actions:  to register, to initiate
inbound message, and to accept.  For example, the user can arrange
these three actions in either of the following sequences and be
guaranteed to receive the correct result.
           ---------0----------0----------0------------ time
                register   initiate     accept
                           inbound
                           message
OR
           ---------0----------0----------0------------ time
                register   accept      initiate
                                       inbound
                                       message

      With a one-verb approach, i.e., combining function of register
and accept into one verb, since the user would not get control back
until the accept part is completed, the user would have no way to
tell when the trap is set up and ready to intercept the inbound
message.  Hence the user does not know when to initiate the inbound
message.  A bad timing of this initiation (i.e., before the trap is
set up successfully) can result in fail...