Browse Prior Art Database

Current-Pumped Glass Laser Device for Integrated Silicon Technology

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121134D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 72K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

DiMaria, DJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a device for generating light by means of current injection into a rare-earth-ion doped insulating film. The device is fabricated using conventional silicon integrated circuit technology.

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Current-Pumped Glass Laser Device for Integrated Silicon Technology

      Disclosed is a device for generating light by means of
current injection into a rare-earth-ion doped insulating film.  The
device is fabricated using conventional silicon integrated circuit
technology.

      Rare earth ions such as Nd3+ or Er3+ form luminescence centers
when implanted into SiO2 films [1].  These form the active centers
for a laser, as in a standard glass laser [2].

      The band structure of the device is shown schematically in the
figure.  The SiO2 film is either grown or deposited on the silicon
substrate.  The rare earth ions are implanted into the SiO2, and the
structure may be annealed if necessary to remove implantation damage.
The device uses electrical current to excite the ions.  Electrons are
injected from a silicon-rich oxide (SRO) injector layer [3] which is
deposited either before or after the SiO2 to form either a top or
bottom injector.

      Thin metal is deposited on the top to provide electrical
contact, and to form one mirror of the laser resonant cavity, with
the silicon substrate forming the other mirror, for a
surface-emitting device.  Alternately, end facets may be fabricated
by cleavage or by wet or dry etching, for a side-emitting device.

      In operation, a current is passed through the SiO2 by applying
a negative bias to the injecting contact.  The rare earth ions in the
SiO2 will be excited by inelastic collisions of hot el...