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Browse Prior Art Database

Method of Manufacturing Thin Film Tape Heads Using Silylated Encapsulation Resist

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121279D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 89K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Denison, EV: AUTHOR

Abstract

The use of thermally crosslinked photoresists for encapsulation during the manufacture of thin film, magnetic tape heads reduces manufacturing efficiency and degrades magnetic performance. A magnetic head manufactured using a thermally crosslinked photoresist for encapsulation is shown in Fig. 1. The underlying structure, including a pole piece 1 and a magnetoresistive layer 2, is manufactured using known thin film technology. The photoresist is then deposited to encapsulate the underlying structure and create a contour suitable for planarization by epoxy deposition. A photoresist layer 3 is deposited and baked to cause crosslinking. The photoresist shrinks substantially during baking, thereby requiring further photoresist deposition to create the desired contour.

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Method of Manufacturing Thin Film Tape Heads Using Silylated Encapsulation
Resist

      The use of thermally crosslinked photoresists for
encapsulation during the manufacture of thin film, magnetic tape
heads reduces manufacturing efficiency and degrades magnetic
performance.  A magnetic head manufactured using a thermally
crosslinked photoresist for encapsulation is shown in Fig. 1.  The
underlying structure, including a pole piece 1 and a magnetoresistive
layer 2, is manufactured using known thin film technology.  The
photoresist is then deposited to encapsulate the underlying structure
and create a contour suitable for planarization by epoxy deposition.
A photoresist layer 3 is deposited and baked to cause crosslinking.
The photoresist shrinks substantially during baking, thereby
requiring further photoresist deposition to create the desired
contour.  Another photoresist layer 4 is therefore deposited and
baked and so on until the desired contour is achieved.  An epoxy
layer 5 is then deposited to planarize the structure so that a
ferrite closure 6 can be bonded thereto.

      Two disadvantages are associated with the previously described
manufacturing method.  First, the photoresist bake processes are time
intensive, thereby limiting manufacturing efficiency.  Second, the
exposure 7 of the epoxy layer at the air bearing surface 8 caused by
the relatively flat profile of shrunken photoresist layers 3 and 4
results in abrasion of the epoxy during lapping a...