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Online Prototype Editing Improves Handwriting Recognition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121285D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Fujisaki, T: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Many online handwriting recognition systems use curve matching methods to match an unknown character against prototype (template) characters [1]. The accuracy of these recognizers depends on the quality of the prototypes. The speed of recognition depends on the number of prototypes. The problem is to design prototype establishment procedures that optimize recognition accuracy and speed.

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Online Prototype Editing Improves Handwriting Recognition

      Many online handwriting recognition systems use curve
matching methods to match an unknown character against prototype
(template) characters [1].  The accuracy of these recognizers depends
on the quality of the prototypes.  The speed of recognition depends
on the number of prototypes. The problem is to design prototype
establishment procedures that optimize recognition accuracy and
speed.

      In order to provide recognition accuracy, desired properties of
prototypes are:
(1) The prototypes should have sufficient coverage, that is, there
should be at least one prototype for each distinct way of writing a
character (or recognition strategies that handle variation).  With
online handwriting, this includes variations in the number, order,
direction, and shape of the strokes of a character.  A stroke is the
writing from pen-down to pen-up.
(2) A prototype should be a good representation of a way of writing a
character.
(3) Prototypes should have reasonable separation in prototype space.

      Disclosed here is a procedure for interactive editing of
prototypes that are close to each other in prototype space.  This
procedure improves the separation of prototypes (property 3, above)
and increases recognition accuracy.  A routine finds those prototypes
that are close to each other in prototype space, using the standard
elastic matching distance [2,3].  These pairs of prototypes are then
examined i...