Browse Prior Art Database

Processor Console Trace Facility

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121288D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dalton, BL: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a trace facility implemented in the Processor Console of a mainframe computer. The Processor Console is a PS/2* computer which is controlled by programs running under OS/2*. OS/2 supports multiple processes and multiple threads within a process. When problems develop within the Processor Console programs, it is helpful to be able to invoke a trace facility to aid in isolation of the problem. The normal way to implement a trace facility is to "enable" the trace by selecting portions of code to be traced.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 55% of the total text.

Processor Console Trace Facility

      Disclosed is a trace facility implemented in the
Processor Console of a mainframe computer.  The Processor Console is
a PS/2* computer which is controlled by programs running under OS/2*.
OS/2 supports multiple processes and multiple threads within a
process.  When problems develop within the Processor Console
programs, it is helpful to be able to invoke a trace facility to aid
in isolation of the problem. The normal way to implement a trace
facility is to "enable" the trace by selecting portions of code to be
traced.

      The trace disclosed here is unique in that the trace is always
running.  Because of this feature, when a problem occurs it is
possible to capture the trace information which led to the failure
rather than having to set the trace and then attempt to recreate the
failure.

      The trace statements are readable messages installed in the
source code by the code developers.  The lowest level of trace, and
the one running at all times, provides messages whenever a
sub-routine is entered or exited.  These messages are created by
calling an OS/2 dynalink routine which stores the message in a 64KB
buffer in memory.  When the buffer is full, the oldest messages are
destroyed to make room for the newer messages.  This rotating buffer
is always available for examination.  In addition, the buffer can be
written to file at any time for later examination.

      Other levels of messages are also provided...