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Quartz Insulation Applied in Two Steps Provides Better Isolation for Conductors in Integrated Circuit Manufacturing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121289D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 75K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Davis, LS: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Quartz is a frequently used insulator in integrated circuit manufacturing. Fig. 1 is a sketch of the process, showing how contaminants embedded in the quartz can cause shorts between adjacent and layered metal lines. The buried contaminants create craters in the quartz after planarization. These craters then become conductive paths after being filled with metal, and electrical shorts can result. Additional processing to eliminate these shorts is shown in Fig. 2. After the first quartz layer is planarized, a second layer is deposited. This second layer is then planarized so that the total thickness of quartz is equal to one layer. The result is an insulating layer of high integrity allowing fewer metal shorts.

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Quartz Insulation Applied in Two Steps Provides Better Isolation
for Conductors in Integrated Circuit Manufacturing

      Quartz is a frequently used insulator in integrated
circuit manufacturing.  Fig. 1 is a sketch of the process, showing
how contaminants embedded in the quartz can cause shorts between
adjacent and layered metal lines.  The buried contaminants create
craters in the quartz after planarization.  These craters then become
conductive paths after being filled with metal, and electrical shorts
can result. Additional processing to eliminate these shorts is shown
in Fig. 2.  After the first quartz layer is planarized, a second
layer is deposited.  This second layer is then planarized so that the
total thickness of quartz is equal to one layer.  The result is an
insulating layer of high integrity allowing fewer metal shorts.