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Relational Database Implementation Techniques for Multiple Language Support

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121327D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 4 page(s) / 102K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Maldonado, MF: AUTHOR

Abstract

The three database implementation techniques described in this article are intended to reduce database maintenance complexity, while providing Multiple Language Support (MLS). The novel aspect of these techniques is that it requires only one copy of the alterable part of the data in contrast to other techniques which require duplication of the data.

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Relational Database Implementation Techniques for Multiple Language
Support

      The three database implementation techniques described in
this article are intended to reduce database maintenance complexity,
while providing Multiple Language Support (MLS). The novel aspect of
these techniques is that it requires only one copy of the alterable
part of the data in contrast to other techniques which require
duplication of the data.

      The techniques described below are illustrated using the base
table TABLE1 as shown in Fig. 1.  Columns T1C2 and T1C3 are columns
in which the data values are language-dependent.  Language-dependent
data means that the data will have different values for each
language.  Some examples are descriptions, remarks, comments,
annotations and so on.  Language-independent data means that the data
will not have a different value for each language.  Numeric data and
identification codes are examples of language-independent data.

      The first technique consists of separating the
language-dependent columns into a different table.  A modified table
(TABLE1M) is built from the original table (TABLE1) using the
language-independent columns and one row for each row in the original
table.  A language table (TABLE1L) is built from the original table
using the language-dependent columns, one row for each row/language
combination, and an added language column.  The key columns for the
language table are the key columns from the original table plus the
added language column.  Fig. 2 shows the modified and language tables
built from the original table TABLE1 (Fig. 1).

      The second technique consists of combining all
language-dependent columns from all tables into one table. A modified
table (TABLE1M) is built from the original table (TABLE1) using the
language-independent columns, one row for each row in the original
table and an added artificial key...