Browse Prior Art Database

Single Click Technique for Rotating Graphical Objects Using a Pointing Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121345D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dean, BW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Rotation of objects with a mouse in a two-dimensional object-oriented drawing tool is greatly simplified with this single button click technique. The technique requires only a single press, drag, and release of a mouse button to perform the rotation of one or more objects. The interface provides real-time rotation of the objects and the user releases the mouse button when the desired angle has been achieved. During this operation, the user has the power to vary the precision of the rotation as necessary.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 55% of the total text.

Single Click Technique for Rotating Graphical Objects Using a Pointing
Device

      Rotation of objects with a mouse in a two-dimensional
object-oriented drawing tool is greatly simplified with this single
button click technique.  The technique requires only a single press,
drag, and release of a mouse button to perform the rotation of one or
more objects.  The interface provides real-time rotation of the
objects and the user releases the mouse button when the desired angle
has been achieved.  During this operation, the user has the power to
vary the precision of the rotation as necessary.

      The technique requires the selection of a rotation tool.  Once
the user does this, the user now has the ability to rotate objects.

      The user moves the mouse over an object and presses down the
mouse button.  This chooses the object for rotation and defines the
center of rotation.

      While continuing to hold down the mouse pointer, the user moves
the mouse.  Each time the user moves the mouse, a line is displayed
from the current mouse location to the center of rotation.  This line
moves with the mouse by pivoting about the center of rotation (see
Fig.  1).  A reference line is also displayed along the positive
x-axis of a right-handed cartesian coordinate system with the origin
at the center of rotation, but the location of this reference line
could follow some other convention.  The angle of rotation is defined
by the angle between the reference...