Browse Prior Art Database

Flying Mail Animation Through the Mouse Pointer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121390D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jefferson, KJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article discusses a visual feedback method for window-based applications to verify that mail has be sent from a user's system. In many applications, there is no user feedback confirming that a mail item has been sent. By using mouse pointer animation, feedback can be provided visually.

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Flying Mail Animation Through the Mouse Pointer

      This article discusses a visual feedback method for
window-based applications to verify that mail has be sent from a
user's system.  In many applications, there is no user feedback
confirming that a mail item has been sent.  By using mouse pointer
animation, feedback can be provided visually.

      When a mail application sends mail, feedback to the user
confirming that a mail item has been sent is generally passive or
strictly text-based.  This type of feedback generates two problems:
1.  No feedback or passive feedback make users uncomfortable about
the success of the mail send function.
2.  Text-based messages interrupt the work of the user and do not
take advantage of the graphical end user interface on a windowing
system.

      Using mouse pointer animation, the above mentioned problems can
be solved providing the user the necessary feedback to indicate
function success.  For mail, the animation technique can be
accomplished in the following manner:
1.  Determine the current position of the mouse pointer.
    Store this position in temporary storage.
2.  Turn the mouse pointer invisible.
3.  Move the invisible mouse pointer to the animation start point and
set it to the desired image for animation.
    (For flying mail, an envelope is a good choice).
4.  Turn the mouse pointer visible.
5.  Move the mouse pointer across the screen both horizontally and
vertically creating the illusion o...