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Browse Prior Art Database

Stacking Chains

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121397D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Sehringer, LT: AUTHOR

Abstract

A paper stacker uses stacking chains of various length chains arranged in a pattern. When chains of the same length have been used, the chains become ineffective in preventing misfolds and jams, when the stack height goes above the bottom of the chain height.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Stacking Chains

      A paper stacker uses stacking chains of various length chains
arranged in a pattern.  When chains of the same length have been
used, the chains become ineffective in preventing misfolds and jams,
when the stack height goes above the bottom of the chain height.

      As shown in Figures 1 and 2 chains 10, 11 and 12 have different
lengths and terminate at different distances above base 13 where
paper 14 folds into a stack 15.  The motion of the paper 14 entering
the stacker creates a sweeping motion of the chains.  This sweeping
motion enhances the folding of the paper 14 as it stacks.  The chains
that are in contact with the paper 14 are dependent upon the height
of paper in the stack 15.  When the stack height is above the bottom
of chain 10, then chains 11 and 12 sweep and come in contact with the
paper 14.  When the stack height raises above the bottom of chain 11,
then chain 12 comes in contact with the paper 14 until the last page
is stacked.

      By using various length chains which are combined in a pattern,
reliability of paper stacking is improved for the entire range of
paper height.

      Disclosed anonymously.