Browse Prior Art Database

Duplex Controllers for a Single Instruction Multiple Data Computer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121421D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Tsao, M: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a duplex controller for a Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD) computer where there are two sequencers, two instruction memories, and two master clocks. The topmost stage of the instruction broadcast tree is also duplicated. The connectivity is shown in the diagram.

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Duplex Controllers for a Single Instruction Multiple Data Computer

      Disclosed is a duplex controller for a Single Instruction
Multiple Data (SIMD) computer where there are two sequencers, two
instruction memories, and two master clocks. The topmost stage of the
instruction broadcast tree is also duplicated.  The connectivity is
shown in the diagram.

      Two Host computers are connected by a private local area
network to allow for communication between them.  When directed by
the Host computer, each sequencer can independently load up its own
instruction store.  When directed, and also in agreement with both
sequencer, the instruction is fetched from the memory and passed to
the top level of the instruction broadcast tree.  At the topmost
stage IBT cage, there are two Receiver boards, and several
Transmitter boards.  The function of the Receiver boards is to
receive the broadcasted instructions from the sequencer and pass them
to the back plan, to be latched by the Transmitter boards.  The
function of the Transmitter boards is to pass the instructions to a
Receiver board in the next lower stage of the IB tree.  At any given
time, only one of the two Receiver boards is allowed to drive
instructions onto the back plan.  The two Host computers and the two
sequencers must be in agreement as to which Receiver board is active,
and which one is in standby.  There is no need for redundancy at
later stages of the IB tree since failures there will affect only
...