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Browse Prior Art Database

Cooperative Method of Implementing Connection IDs Between Computers and Smartphones

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121463D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 3 page(s) / 130K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Berkson, SP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for implementing the "connection model" of telephone call-control signaling on "smartphone" devices. A smartphone is a telephone device which contains a microprocessor which is capable of performing advanced tasks related to the handling of telephone calls. For example, it is capable of informing a computer of incoming calls, which line is ringing, the telephone number of the originator of the call, and the number which the originator dialed. The computer can act on this information to search databases and present the results to a human operator who answers the call. The Rolmphone 244PC is an example of such a device.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 48% of the total text.

Cooperative Method of Implementing Connection IDs Between Computers
and Smartphones

      Disclosed is a method for implementing the "connection
model" of telephone call-control signaling on "smartphone" devices. A
smartphone is a telephone device which contains a microprocessor
which is capable of performing advanced tasks related to the handling
of telephone calls.  For example, it is capable of informing a
computer of incoming calls, which line is ringing, the telephone
number of the originator of the call, and the number which the
originator dialed. The computer can act on this information to search
databases and present the results to a human operator who answers the
call. The Rolmphone 244PC is an example of such a device.

      In order to uniquely identify each valid connection occurring
in a smartphone, the connection model postulates the existence of an
identifying string of characters called a "connection_ID".  To
perform this naming function, connection_IDs are supposed to appear
within the call-control signaling protocol in the telecommunications
network. But currently, no existing telecommunications equipment
(smartphones or switches) does this, i.e., the telecommunications
network does not provide connection_IDs to uniquely identify valid
connections. In fact, no identification scheme of any kind is
provided at the connection level.

      This creates a problem in connecting a computer to the
telecommunications network to perform call-control applications. The
connection_ID model is often the model of choice, but as explained
above, it is not enabled by the telecommunications network.

      This article describes a method for solving this problem by
implementing the connection_ID generation, tracking, and destruction
procedures in the computer, rather than in the telecommunications
network.  Specifically, a smartphone is connected to a computer in
order to track the states of a set of lines. This information becomes
input for an algorithm which generates and destroys connection_IDs
corresponding to the real telephone calls taking place on that set of
lines. Disclosed herein is the procedural description of this
algorithm and its associated data structures.

      The "connection_ID model" is a concept used by the designers of
telephone hardware and software in order to understand the various
tasks involved in handling telephone calls.  It is currently
documented as part of the "Callpath Services Architecture" (CSA). The
model states that a "call" consists of two or more "connections"
between "parties".  A "party" is an addressable participant of a
telephone call. A "connection" represents a party's participation in
a given telephone call.

      Currently, smartphones are not capable of supporting
connection_ IDs in the true sense of their original design. This
results from the fact that existing hardware has not been designed to
address objects other than "lines" on which "calls" take place.
Ne...