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Browse Prior Art Database

Strategies for Appending and Replacing List Selections

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121529D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 3 page(s) / 145K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Li, SG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a design detailing strategies that application programs can take to append or replace selected items from a single-select list to an editable working area and vice versa.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 41% of the total text.

Strategies for Appending and Replacing List Selections

      Disclosed is a design detailing strategies that
application programs can take to append or replace selected items
from a single-select list to an editable working area and vice versa.

      Application programs use list boxes to provide the user with a
scrollable way of viewing all the selections for a particular
function or field.  They typically operate in a standard fashion,
allowing the user to select an item by double clicking on the entry,
which may consist of a command or selection for the field.  The
program then uses the item in the context in which the listbox was
used.  This may consist of filling in a field with the selected entry
or using the selected item as a filter for refreshing other lists.
The case of using the selected item in conjunction with an editable
text area presents a variety of interaction techniques that the user
and program could exploit.

      To demonstrate these strategies, an example using a working
area and command list will be used.  The working area is an editable
text area where the user can freely move the cursor, insert, modify,
and delete text.  Sections of the working area could also be cut or
copied to the clipboard and the contents of the clipboard could be
pasted in the working area.  This area operates much like the window
of a text editor.

      The command list is a single select list that the user can
scroll to view commands, such as ones for DOS commands. They can be
single commands, such as "DIR", or compound commands, such as "ERASE
*.*; RESTORE".  (The semicolons are used only to separate the
individual commands.  These compound commands exist as a single entry
in the command list.)  A toggle also exists to allow the user to
switch between the append and replace modes.  This can take the form
of radio buttons or a selection from the action bar.

      The working area and command list could reside in separate
panels in a single application window or they could exist in their
own windows. However, they must both be present and accessible for
the user to take advantage of the append and replace interaction
techniques.

      Depending on whether the replace or append option is active,
the selected item from the command list could do the following:
     * Replace the entire working area.  The user could use this
option to flush the contents of the working area and start with a
selected command without performing the two-step process of clearing
the working area and selecting an item.
     * Append the selection to the bottom of the text in the working
area. This would be useful in the example where the list contained
single commands and the user wanted to build up a batch file
consisting of selected commands in a sequential order.  (Compound
commands could also be appended in this fashion.)
     * Append the selection to the current cursor position. This
strategy would provide more...