Browse Prior Art Database

Design Extensions to Contents View

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121566D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 4 page(s) / 196K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Temple, AC: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is an extension to the design of a standard contents view that provides increased function as well as a number of valuable user- productivity improvements for the next generation of front-of-screen design.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 30% of the total text.

Design Extensions to Contents View

      Disclosed is an extension to the design of a standard
contents view that provides increased function as well as a number of
valuable user- productivity improvements for the next generation of
front-of-screen design.

      Windows provide views onto objects (e.g., Files, Charts,
Folders, Printers, etc.).  Various views are supported as standard,
but the most common are the 'Composed' and 'Contents' views.  The
Composed view provides the presentation view of the object (e.g.,
page layout for a document), while the Contents view provides a list
of what is in a container (e.g., the list of documents in a folder).
The system supports default views, normally Contents for containers
and Composed for non-containers.  Almost every object contains other
objects (e.g., a document contains drawings, paragraphs, etc.), so
the contents view is applicable for all but the most basic of
objects, and should be supported.  Similarly, all objects may have a
composed view, though this need only be implemented, if appropriate.

      The Contents view is employed to locate objects and allows the
user to browse through one or more containers, which would normally
be arranged in a hierarchy, looking for the desired object.  Each
container may be considered to be a folder in a file cabinet, and the
system permits folders to be kept within other folders.

      Users create folders to conveniently group together sets of
related objects.  They make use of the hierarchy support to further
cluster set of folders.  This method of working is very effective
having much similarity to normal office practices, but it places two
basic requirements on the user.  First, the user must sensibly
cluster and name sets of objects (simple rearrangement facilities are
provided).  Second, users must be able to access existing objects
easily by providing their full reference, e.g., names of each
container in the specific leg of the hierarchy together with the name
of the individual object.  Full reference may be provided by key
entry or by browsing through the hierarchy using the Contents view on
the Containers.  The latter is generally adopted to save time and
reduce the chance of typing errors.

      The Contents view provides a list of the contents of a
container which may be displayed in a variety of formats such as a
simple row- by-row list of the objects in the container, with the
name and date created, its class, etc. That format is sometimes
applicable, but the most common presentation of the list depicts the
objects as icons which are a more visual representation of the object
and enable more rapid identification.

      This browsing operation is performed every time an object needs
to be accessed.  It is a common task that occupies a significant
proportion of user's time at the workstation and is why the
'Workplace' model was introduced. Here, a window is provided that
contains the contents view of...