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Power High Current Connection to Printed Wiring Boards

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121578D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 3 page(s) / 89K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cox, RL: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a connector to a printed wiring board (PWB) that increases the connector's post width.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Power High Current Connection to Printed Wiring Boards

      This article describes a connector to a printed wiring
board (PWB) that increases the connector's post width.

      To achieve power connections to planar PWBs, the typical
approach is to use a number of contact connections in parallel to
have the required current handling capacity. As larger systems are
developed, higher current is required to be delivered to the planar
which means more contacts or pins in the connector.

      The planar designer is obliged to make his planars smaller and
smaller so that the system unit can be reduced in size.  At the same
time, the function on the planar needs to be increased which means
more or larger chips.  In either event, there is motivation to
decrease the amount of area needed for every function on the planar.
This extends to the power connector as well.

      Each basic contact used in connectors has, due to its design, a
basic insertion and withdrawal force covered in its specification. As
the number of pins increase, the amount of force needed to plug and
unplug the connector increases.  The answer is to increase the
contact pin current capability, reducing the number of pins.

      There are several characteristics of contacts and connectors
that control their use as power interconnect devices for planars.
They are the contact resistance and the ability to remove heat from
the contact.  Connectors and contacts are rated by the contact
resistance, the current, and the temperature rise.

      The current flowing through the contact will cause a voltage
drop to develop across contact resistances, resulting in a power loss
and heat developing.  The voltage drop is a critical factor in power
distribution, in this case, to the planar.  The pins of the connector
are usually soldered onto the planar so that the solder connection to
the planar also generates a voltage drop.  The voltage drop across
the contact and across the...