Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Office Initialization Cancel Capability

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121635D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cox, D: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes a method for OS/2* Office to provide the ability to cancel Initialization, and to gracefully bring down the Initialization tasks which have already completed, at any time during the Initialization process.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Office Initialization Cancel Capability

      This article describes a method for OS/2* Office to
provide the ability to cancel Initialization, and to gracefully bring
down the Initialization tasks which have already completed, at any
time during the Initialization process.

      OS/2 Office Initialization is a series of steps run to bring up
and connect to Office subsystems.  OS/2 Office Initialization is also
configurable.  Any number of integrated Office applications may be
started, and any number of non-integrated applications may be
configured to start via the Office Initialization process.  There is
no set amount of time in which Initialization will complete, so
Initialization could take a long time.  During this process the user
may realize that they do not wish to continue with initialization.
They may wish to reconfigure their initialization process to add or
remove specific steps in the process, or due to an error or warning
they may wish to halt the process.

      Most applications (including OS/2) cannot be brought down
gracefully until they have been brought completely up. By
"gracefully" we mean that the personal computer does NOT need to be
rebooted, nor does the process need to be killed using a separate
program to kill processes.

      Most user-oriented applications try to maintain constant
interaction with a user, as defined by the Common User Interface
guidelines.  However, this interaction is not provided until the
application is actually up and running. During the time it takes to
load and execute the application, and bring in any application data,
the user does not normally have a chance to cancel the start-up
process.

      Since OS/2 Office Initialization is a series of steps, some
starting separate processes, it would be difficult for the user to
know which processes needed to be halted, and in which order, to
bring do...