Browse Prior Art Database

Tailoring the Footprint of a Wireless Communications Cell

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121683D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Harrison, CG: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for shaping the reception area of a wireless communications cell, which may be used for data communications between a mobile computer and a base station [1, 2].

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 95% of the total text.

Tailoring the Footprint of a Wireless Communications Cell

      Disclosed is a method for shaping the reception area of a
wireless communications cell, which may be used for data
communications between a mobile computer and a base station [1, 2].

      The reception area of a cell is principally determined by the
radiation pattern of the base station's antenna. This antenna may
take the form of a distributed antenna or a leaky feeder antenna.  A
distributed antenna consists of a conventional coaxial distribution
cable, which is weakly coupled to a number of antennas (for example,
simple dipoles) along its length.  A leaky feeder is a cable which is
designed with imperfect shielding so that radio-frequency energy
leaks from it continuously along its length.  Such antennas are run
through the areas where coverage is desired.  By adjusting the amount
of coupling in the distributed antenna or the amount of leakage in
the leaky feeder, the width of the reception area surrounding the
antenna can be controlled.  Specifically the width can be made
non-uniform by tapering the coupling or the leakage appropriately, so
that uniform sensitivity can be maintained over an entire area, as
shown in the figure.

      References
(1)  A. A. M. Saleh, A. J. Rustako, Jr. and R. S. Roman, "Distributed
Antennas for Indoor Radio Communications," IEEE Transactions on
Communications COM-35, 1245-1251 (December 1987).
(2)  R. Steele, "The cellular environment of lightweight handh...