Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Universal Node Identification Technique

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121705D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Heins, DE: AUTHOR

Abstract

Nodes in computer networks are commonly identified by coined names representing a particular node within a particular network. For example RALYDPD4(PRNTR38) may identify a particular printer (PRNTR38) in a particular computer network (RALYDPD4).

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Universal Node Identification Technique

      Nodes in computer networks are commonly identified by
coined names representing a particular node within a particular
network.  For example RALYDPD4(PRNTR38) may identify a particular
printer (PRNTR38) in a particular computer network (RALYDPD4).

      Since the coined name contains no information indicating the
physical location of the node, the network must include directories
which provide a correlation between the coined name and the physical
location of the node.

      A universal node identification technique is proposed.
According to this technique, each node in a computer network would be
identified by its three-dimensional physical location on the Earth.
Two of the dimensions would be latitude and longitude.  The third
dimension would indicate the vertical distance of the node above or
below either the elevation at the specified latitude/longitude or a
reference level, such as sea level.

      To identify the physical location of a node anywhere on Earth
in a space no larger than two feet by two feet by two feet would
require 26 bits of longitude information, 25 bits of latitude
information and 11 bits of vertical information where height is
measured above or below the local elevation.