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Inter-client Resource Usage in Distributed Client Server Presentation Manager System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121764D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 64K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Anthias, T: AUTHOR

Abstract

This technique relates to the management of inter-client resources in a distributed client-server presentation system. In such a system, resources, such as cut and paste clipboard, the keyboard, the mouse, etc., need to be managed across a number of client systems each connected to a display server, where the end user is.

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Inter-client Resource Usage in Distributed Client Server Presentation
Manager System

      This technique relates to the management of inter-client
resources in a distributed client-server presentation system.  In
such a system, resources, such as cut and paste clipboard, the
keyboard, the mouse, etc., need to be managed across a number of
client systems each connected to a display server, where the end user
is.

      Such resources can be managed by the server providing specific
functions for each resource (e.g., clipboard ownership).  This has
the disadvantage that a client presentation system can only implement
inter-client support which the server has specifically catered for.
As the tendency for display servers is towards providing low-cost
fixed function terminals (e.g., X-terminals), it leads to a
constraint on what can be provided by client systems.  Prior art in
the provision of servers has imposed explicit mechanisms for handling
inter-client policies.  The described approach of providing generic
mechanisms is new.

      The scheme provides a generic approach to the problem of
explicit server mechanisms by providing generic server functions,
neutral to any specific client policies.  The Server provides
inter-client resource support by managing named "logical resources".
Clients use these to assign global ownership.  For example, assuming
an OS/2* Presentation Manager* client system, a "FOCUS" resource is
created and ownership is acquired by cli...