Browse Prior Art Database

Presentation Controls in a Distributed System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121792D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 66K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Anthias, T: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article describes a technique for a presentation system such as OS/2* Presentation Manager* (PM) that allows system-provided window objects known as CONTROLS to be treated for the best distribution characteristics. Prior art in this area has executed controls either entirely on the client side or entirely on the server side. The disclosed identification of an optional distribution split is new.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 55% of the total text.

Presentation Controls in a Distributed System

      This article describes a technique for a presentation
system such as OS/2* Presentation Manager* (PM) that allows
system-provided window objects known as CONTROLS to be treated for
the best distribution characteristics.  Prior art in this area has
executed controls either entirely on the client side or entirely on
the server side.  The disclosed identification of an optional
distribution split is new.

      A client/server model is assumed with the application executing
on a client system and the graphics data being drawn on the server
system, where the end user is.  The question arises as to where
system-provided controls should execute.  It appears at first sight
that the entire control should reside in the server to optimize
traffic from the client and handle the input (e.g. keystrokes) into
input controls, but there are a number of disadvantages to this. On
the majority of distribution mechanisms, the control executes
entirely on the client system (cf X-Windows).

      This scheme adopts an approach that eliminates the
disadvantages inherent in placing the controls in the server while
retaining the advantage of reduced output traffic. Interfaces to a PM
control are shown in the figure.  Control is broken into three
components.  The View Management component paints the control and is
the primary interface to the server.  The other components interface
with the client components and the application v...