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Interchangeable Keyboard Layout for a Bidirectional And Multilingual Computer Environment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121798D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gilani, NB: AUTHOR

Abstract

As the computer industry becomes more responsive to international customers, and has responded by supporting multilingual operating systems and application programs, the need for a uniform keyboard layout has become more of necessity. The keyboard layout, the placement of alphabetic characters on keyboard, has been standardized for languages that have been driven from Latin language. Other languages, especially the ones that begin writing from right to left have a different origin, and have adopted different keyboard layout standards. That is the characters that have similar phonetic sounds, say phonetic sound 'a', do not occupy the same keyboard position as the letter 'a' in Latin language.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Interchangeable Keyboard Layout for a Bidirectional And Multilingual
Computer Environment

      As the computer industry becomes more responsive to
international customers, and has responded by supporting multilingual
operating systems and application programs, the need for a uniform
keyboard layout has become more of necessity. The keyboard layout,
the placement  of alphabetic characters on keyboard, has been
standardized for languages that have been driven from Latin language.
Other languages, especially the ones that begin writing from right to
left have a different origin, and have adopted different keyboard
layout standards.  That is the characters that have similar phonetic
sounds, say phonetic sound 'a', do not occupy the same keyboard
position as the letter 'a' in Latin language. The problem may not be
apparent to a Latin-oriented user, but for users who may wish to use
Latin and, say, Arabic/Farsi language simultaneously, it becomes
quite clear.  Languages, such as Arabic, Farsi, Hebrew, Urdu, and
others, have different keyboard layout for the same phonetically
similar letters.  An Arabic, or a Farsi-speaking individual wishing
to communicate with a computer, via a keyboard, has to learn, at
least, two different keyboard layouts, and at times, it becomes
difficult to remember the keyboard position of each letter.

      The  solution to this problem is to allow the user to select
and or design phonetically equal keyboard layouts according to their
needs and taste.

      One of the...