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Direct Access Storage Device Parts Cleanliness Monitoring Using Fluorescent Organic Oils

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121822D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 33K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hoffman, RJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Certain organic compounds that are not easily visible under normal or incandescent lighting give off a distinctive glow when illuminated with ultraviolet light. The ultraviolet light has a wave length that interacts with certain chemical bonds found primarily in organic compounds. This effect is known as fluorescence. This effect can be used to detect monomolecular thickness's of metallic organic cutting fluids not easily or cheaply detectable with other techniques. If the cutting fluid in use does not exhibit this behavior, an organic fluid that does can be used as a "witness" contaminant. This contaminant is spread onto the part in question and cleaned. It is then subjected to ultraviolet light inspection to determine the degree of removal by the cleaning process.

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Direct Access Storage Device Parts Cleanliness Monitoring Using Fluorescent
Organic Oils

      Certain organic compounds that are not easily visible under
normal or incandescent lighting give off a distinctive glow when
illuminated with ultraviolet light.  The ultraviolet light has a wave
length that interacts with certain chemical bonds found primarily in
organic compounds.  This effect is known as fluorescence.  This
effect can be used to detect monomolecular thickness's of metallic
organic cutting fluids not easily or cheaply detectable with other
techniques.  If the cutting fluid in use does not exhibit this
behavior, an organic fluid that does can be used as a "witness"
contaminant.  This contaminant is spread onto the part in question
and cleaned.  It is then subjected to ultraviolet light inspection to
determine the degree of removal by the cleaning process.  This method
is subjective, but numerical values can be placed on the degree of
fluorescence and tracked by a statistical process control technique.
This method is particularly useful for a go-no go (clean-dirty)
determination.  The method is inexpensive and can be adapted easily
for use at a vendor's machine shop.

      Disclosed anonymously.