Browse Prior Art Database

Continuous Real Time Monitor for Liquid Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121844D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bonnel, RE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for sampling liquid systems continuously with a high degree of precision. The method uses a semi-permeable membrane immersed in the liquid bath or in a continuously circulating sampling cell. The disclosed invention is an inexpensive, low-maintenance system for sampling fluid systems on a real-time basis. The system operates on the principle of liquid diffusion through a semi-permeable membrane. In its simplest form, a piece of thin wall duPont Teflon tubing of known length is immersed in a liquid bath. The diffusion rate of the compounds in the bath are related directly to the bath concentrations. A simple calibration by dipping the loop of tubing into known concentrations could be used to calibrate the system at a given flow rate and then the tube immersed in the bath.

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Continuous Real Time Monitor for Liquid Systems

      Disclosed is a method for sampling liquid systems continuously
with a high degree of precision.  The method uses a semi-permeable
membrane immersed in the liquid bath or in a continuously circulating
sampling cell. The disclosed invention is an inexpensive,
low-maintenance system for sampling fluid systems on a real-time
basis.  The system operates on the principle of liquid diffusion
through a semi-permeable membrane.  In its simplest form, a piece of
thin wall duPont Teflon tubing of known length is immersed in a
liquid bath.  The diffusion rate of the compounds in the bath are
related directly to the bath concentrations.  A simple calibration by
dipping the loop of tubing into known concentrations could be used to
calibrate the system at a given flow rate and then the tube immersed
in the bath.  The air-monitoring device would continuously draw
sample air through the tubing, removing the liquid which has diffused
to the inner tube wall, thus keeping a constant diffusion gradient.
The air-sampling device would then be able to directly monitor the
bath concentrations in real time.  The Tau value (delay or response
time) for the process control algorithm would be limited only by the
length and choice of membrane material.  Each type of liquid system
would need a tailored membrane for optimum response time.

      Anonymous.