Browse Prior Art Database

Opto-superconducting Motor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121903D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-03
Document File: 3 page(s) / 113K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Winarski, DJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article uses the following facts to design an opto-superconducting motor.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Opto-superconducting Motor

      This article uses the following facts to design an
opto-superconducting motor.

      Today's high temperature superconductors lose their
superconductivity when heated above a certain temperature called a
critical temperature.  This state of superconductivity is reversible,
i.e., it is regained when these materials are cooled below that
temperature.

      One measure of superconductivity is the repulsion of magnetic
flux, the Meisner effect.

      Figs. 1A-1F show the essence of this disclosure.  A motor is
defined with one permanent magnet 10 and an armature 30 with three
superconducting pads 31, 32 and 33. The interior of the motor is
cooled by a cryogenic gas so that the pads on the armature are
normally superconductive. Two miniature diode lasers 20 and 21 are
used to selectively heat the pads on the armature so that they
temporarily cease to be superconductive.  These two lasers are
separated by 60 degrees.  Laser-induced heating and cryogenic cooling
provides rotation to the armature.

      The use of cryogenic gases allows cooling of the heated pads
over a short period of time, as opposed to immersion in a cryogenic
liquid which would provide nearly instantaneous cooling.

      In Fig. 1A, the proposed motor is shown in its equilibrium
position, with the armature in an upside-down "Y" position.  At time
zero, all pads on the armature are superconducting.  To begin
spinning the armature, laser 20 warms pad 31 in Fig. 1A above its
critical temperature.  Pad 31 ceases to be superconductive and loses
its Meisner effect.  This local loss of repulsive force causes the
armature to rotate clockwise 60 degrees, as shown in Fig. 1B, with
the armature now in a "Y" position.

      In Fig. 1B, laser 21 senses for pad 32 via a low-level laser
"sense" output.  Once pad 32 is sensed, laser 21 goes to a high-power
"heat" level of output and warms pad 32 above its critical
temperature.  Pad 32 ceases to be superconductive and loses its
Meisner effect.  This local loss of repulsive force causes the
armature to rotate clockwise another 60 degrees and assume the
upside-down "Y" position shown in Fig. 1C.  Additional heating of pad
32 could be provided by laser 20 at this time.  Pad 31, first to be
heated, now cools on the far side of the permanent magnet and becomes
superconductive again.  The regained Meisner effect from pad 31
causes the armature rotates another 60 degrees clockwise and assumes
a "Y" position (Fig.  1D).

      Now the cycle of operation is evident.  In Fig. 1D, Pad 33
would be sensed by laser 21 and then heated above its critical
temperature.  The armature would r...