Browse Prior Art Database

Energetic Particle Induced Reactions in Adsorbed Phase at Cryogenic Temperature for Material Growth and Processing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121965D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 66K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Avouris, P: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a UHV-compatible method for growth of thin-films and hetero-layer material structures, in which energetic particles (photons, electrons, ions) induce reactions in adsorbed molecular layers established with controlled compositions at cryogenic temperatures.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 53% of the total text.

Energetic Particle Induced Reactions in Adsorbed Phase at Cryogenic
Temperature for Material Growth and Processing

      Disclosed is a UHV-compatible method for growth of
thin-films and hetero-layer material structures, in which energetic
particles (photons, electrons, ions) induce reactions in adsorbed
molecular layers established with controlled compositions at
cryogenic temperatures.

      At low temperatures (T<100~K) most of the gases of
technological importance adsorb on substrate surfaces with high
sticking probability and form adsorbed molecular layers.  The
composition of such adlayers can sensitively be controlled by the
partial pressure of reactant gases, which determines the equilibrium
coverage at a given temperature.

      Upon exposure to proper energetic particles, molecules in the
adsorbed layer undergo electronic excitations and decomposition into
reactive species [1,2].  The so formed reactive species react with
the substrate, with other co-adsorbed species or possibly with
incoming molecules from the gas phase.  This process results in
low-temperature growth of films with compositions determined by that
of the adsorbed molecular layers.

      The film growth rate, i.e., the thickness of the film deposited
in a given length of time can be kinetically controlled either by the
adsorption rate related to the partial pressure of the reactant
molecules or by the flux of the energetic particle beam.  At low
enough temperature molecules a...