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Process Enhancement for Planar Processed Silica Glass Waveguide Consolidation in the Presence of Metal Lines for Optoelectronic Integrated Packaging

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000121991D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 3 page(s) / 115K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Caulfield, T: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Planar-processed optical waveguides are becoming increasingly important for implementing optical interconnections within high density electronic computer environments. Planar-processed optical waveguides may allow for greater packing density of optoelectronic components and may yield low-cost optoelectronic modules by providing an "optical bench" for automatically aligned, batch-processed and assembled, optical components. Planar-processed waveguides can be fabricated using a variety of materials, including polymers and glasses; however, to be advantageous in high-density electronic environments, waveguides must be merged with electronic packages so that both optical and electrical wires are contained on a single substrate.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Process Enhancement for Planar Processed Silica Glass Waveguide Consolidation
in the Presence of Metal Lines for Optoelectronic Integrated Packaging

      Planar-processed optical waveguides are becoming
increasingly important for implementing optical interconnections
within high density electronic computer environments.
Planar-processed optical waveguides may allow for greater packing
density of optoelectronic components and may yield low-cost
optoelectronic modules by providing an "optical bench" for
automatically aligned, batch-processed and assembled, optical
components.  Planar-processed waveguides can be fabricated using a
variety of materials, including polymers and glasses; however, to be
advantageous in high-density electronic environments, waveguides must
be merged with electronic packages so that both optical and
electrical wires are contained on a single substrate.  Unfortunately,
many waveguide fabrication processes are incompatible with electronic
packaging substrates and assembly technologies. One attractive
waveguide fabrication approach, using silica glasses, adapts the
well-known process used in making extremely low-loss round optical
fibers for planar- processed guides [*].  In this fabrication
approach, the waveguide material (primarily silica glass with some
dopants), in exact stoichiometry of its constituents, is first
deposited onto the substrate as a porous (soot like) powder using a
flame hydrolysis technique.  The porous glass soot is then
consolidated at temperatures greater than 1200oC for 1-2 hours in an
oxygen-rich ambient.  As a consequence of this consolidation step,
non-noble metal wiring on or within the substrate will revert to ore
if not completely vaporized during such a thermal excursion.  In
particular, the molybdenum wiring used in IBM 9211 ceramic modules is
incompatible with such a thermal treatment.  In an effort to
integrate existing glass waveguide build technology with present IBM
wiring metallization schemes, a glass consolidation process
modificatio...