Browse Prior Art Database

Device for Dynamically Altering Slider Flying Height

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122010D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 56K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hoyt, RF: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Long-term reliability of the head-disk interface in DASD devices is known to be a very sensitive function of the head-disk spacing. In today's products, this spacing is 150-350 nm, and the need to increase areal densities in future products will drive these spacings to the 50-150 nm range. This decreased spacing brings with it an increased reliability risk. The evolutionary approach to this problem involves improvements in disk smoothness, surface treatment and interface materials. A complementary approach, described here, is to reduce the risk by diminishing the amount of time a slider spends at low spacings to the minimum required for data transfer operations.

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Device for Dynamically Altering Slider Flying Height

      Long-term reliability of the head-disk interface in DASD
devices is known to be a very sensitive function of the head-disk
spacing.  In today's products, this spacing is 150-350 nm, and the
need to increase areal densities in future products will drive these
spacings to the 50-150 nm range.  This decreased spacing brings with
it an increased reliability risk.  The evolutionary approach to this
problem involves improvements in disk smoothness, surface treatment
and interface materials.  A complementary approach, described here,
is to reduce the risk by diminishing the amount of time a slider
spends at low spacings to the minimum required for data transfer
operations.

      In the present invention, the reduced duty cycle for low flying
is achieved by using a conventional slider and suspension with a
modified mounting arrangement (see the figure).  The suspension is
mounted so that it may pivot about a line at which the slider is
attached to the "arm." The gram loading on the slider is varied by an
electrical signal applied to a transducer.  This transducer could be
constructed of a variety of designs, i.e., voice-coil,
piezo-electric, bellows, thermal or shape memory alloys.

      With this concept the load on the slider could be varied from
near zero to about 10 grams.  With the shortened lever arm to the
pivot point this would require a maximum force of about 40 gms from
the transducer.  Curre...