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Fiber Optic Module Interface Attachment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122064D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Baldwin, C: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Fiber Optics uses light signals as opposed to the traditional use of electrical signals to transmit data. This requires the conversion of electrical signals to optical signals and vice-versa. The module is responsible for sending and receiving these signals and performing the necessary conversions. Attached to the module is a plastic shroud. The shroud holds the interfacing device in place and allows different media, such as fiber optic wrap plugs, the opportunity to communicate with the module.

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Fiber Optic Module Interface Attachment

      Fiber Optics uses light signals as opposed to the traditional
use of electrical signals to transmit data. This requires the
conversion of electrical signals to optical signals and vice-versa.
The module is responsible for sending and receiving these signals and
performing the necessary conversions.  Attached to the module is a
plastic shroud.  The shroud holds the interfacing device in place and
allows different media, such as fiber optic wrap plugs, the
opportunity to communicate with the module.

      World standards regulate the use of the lasers by imposing
strict safety guidelines.  The laser's light must never come into
direct view at any time.  To guard against accidental exposure,
should the connector disengage during operation, self-closing
shutters have been installed into the shell.  Various devices, such
as optical wrap plugs, were not designed to plug to Laser modules
with safety shutters, and upon removal from the shroud, they get
stuck in the shutters.  This invention prevents this from happening.
The invention consists of a very thin piece of formed mylar.  The
mylar is attached to the shutter and acts as a ramp to allow smooth
exits from the module, eliminating the problem of devices getting
"hung up" on the shutters.

      Disclosed anonymously.