Browse Prior Art Database

Heat Transfer Device for Electronic Modules

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122071D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ellsworth Jr, MJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This disclosure describes a technique in which the magnitude of the total thermal resistance between a computer chip 1 and a heat sink (i.e. cooling water) is reduced to levels which can support over 130 Watts/chip (10 mm chip). This is accomplished by utilizing a high thermal conductivity (K) paste 2 contained within a protective shell 3 which is sandwiched between the chip and a copper plate 4. The shell is intended to keep the high K paste, an all metal paste, for example, from contaminating the electronics. The shell is also designed to be flexible in the vertical direction, thereby providing a mechanism in which the vertical tolerances of the module may be accounted.

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Heat Transfer Device for Electronic Modules

      This disclosure describes a technique in which the magnitude of
the total thermal resistance between a computer chip 1 and a heat
sink (i.e. cooling water) is reduced to levels which can support over
130 Watts/chip (10 mm chip).  This is accomplished by utilizing a
high thermal conductivity (K) paste 2 contained within a protective
shell 3 which is sandwiched between the chip and a copper plate 4.
The shell is intended to keep the high K paste, an all metal paste,
for example, from contaminating the electronics.  The shell is also
designed to be flexible in the vertical direction, thereby providing
a mechanism in which the vertical tolerances of the module may be
accounted.

      The size (i.e., the number of chips one shell covers) and
number of protective shells can vary depending on desired performance
and the module's tolerances.  Shells of various thicknesses and/or
paste compositions (different thermal conductivities) can be utilized
to customize cooling and provide uniform temperatures across the
module.

      Disclosed anonymously.