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Browse Prior Art Database

Use of "Dummy Device" Session for Downloading Fix Info to Remote Controllers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122129D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 63K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brodd, JL: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

A way of downloading controller fix data to remote terminal controllers from hosts that does not depend on the type of devices attached to the remote controller is disclosed. This method consists of starting a "fake" SNA (Systems Network Architecture) session to a "device" that does not exist, downloading the controller fixes, and ending the "fake" session.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 59% of the total text.

Use of "Dummy Device" Session for Downloading Fix Info to Remote
Controllers

      A way of downloading controller fix data to remote
terminal controllers from hosts that does not depend on the type of
devices attached to the remote controller is disclosed. This method
consists of starting a "fake" SNA (Systems Network Architecture)
session to a "device" that does not exist, downloading the controller
fixes, and ending the "fake" session.

      In the past, remote controller fixes would be sent on the first
active "real device" session brought up when the controller and
attached devices are varied on and brought to "SIGNON DISPLAY" or
data is sent to an attached printer.

      This invention changes the process so that remote controller
fixes are sent on a "fake" SNA session that is created when the
controller itself is varied on.

      When the controller is "brought up" (varied on), it will tell
the host the local address of the session to be used for the "fake"
session.  Alternatively, the host could use a certain
"pre-configured" address if the controller does not send this
information.  The local address would be selected by the remote
controller such that NO physical device could be configured at that
address.  (Usually, it is "the highest address at which a physical
device could be configured plus one".)  The host will then send SNA
ACTLU (Activate Logical Unit) to that local address.  When it
receives a positive response, it will send a SNA B...