Browse Prior Art Database

Clavier - Windows Based on Virtual Keyboard Program

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122135D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, CD: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A program is disclosed that associates virtual or physical keystrokes with single or multiple applications running in a windowing environment. This binding of a specific keyboard to a designated application(s) facilitates an international environment for multilingual users.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 83% of the total text.

Clavier - Windows Based on Virtual Keyboard Program

      A program is disclosed that associates virtual or
physical keystrokes with single or multiple applications running in a
windowing environment.  This binding of a specific keyboard to a
designated application(s) facilitates an international environment
for multilingual users.

      The purpose of the program is to provide a single environment
that allows input given in multiple languages. This implementation is
done on AIX* using X Windows** and Socket (Berkeley Software
Distribution programming interface) features, but the concept can be
extended to any multiprocessing operating system with a windowing
facility and some form of interprocess communications.  During
standard X Window operations, a newly created xterm forks its own
shell.  In order to transmit the character from various keyboards to
the application running in the xterm, a new approach is taken.  A
process called "ts" for terminal simulator is forked instead of a
shell and works as a conduit for the characters from the keyboard.

      The second primary process, called "mc", is an event handler
for X Window defined events of keystrokes, mouse button press, window
exposure, window boundary crossing, and window moving and resizing.
The mc process sends characters to ts through a socket connection.
Pseudo ttys (ptys) are then used to pass the character to the
application through the shell.  ts opens one side of the pty and
forks a child p...