Browse Prior Art Database

Use of Screen Regions for Graphics Interaction

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122149D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Watson, D: AUTHOR

Abstract

Described is a software scheme that provides three-dimensional (3D) information on x, y and z rotation of an image, together with scaling directly from the VDU screen using the two-dimensional (2D) cursor. The method is applicable to applications which require users to provide information to be used for 3D rotations of graphical objects.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 57% of the total text.

Use of Screen Regions for Graphics Interaction

      Described is a software scheme that provides
three-dimensional (3D) information on x, y and z rotation of an
image, together with scaling directly from the VDU screen using the
two-dimensional (2D) cursor.  The method is applicable to
applications which require users to provide information to be used
for 3D rotations of graphical objects.

      To rotate a graphical object under user control an application
needs information from the user.  The input can come from a hardware
device, such as valuator dials, a spaceball or can be via the screen
cursor.  A screen cursor is a 2D device but rotations on 3D objects
require a third degree of freedom to input.

      Code written at the UK Scientific Centre and known as WINVIS90
implements a scheme for obtaining information on x, y and z rotations
together with scaling directly from the screen.  This method is
applicable to workstations with screen cursors which can be moved to
any pixel on the display surface.  In the environment for which this
method was developed, it allows users to interact with the
application using only a mouse.

      The viewing area is split into three areas as shown in the
diagram.  When the screen cursor is in area "A" and is moved
vertically, x rotations are performed.  When the screen cursor is in
area "B" and the cursor is moved horizontally, y rotations are
performed.  Within the area "C" a diagonal cursor movement in the "N...