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Electrodeposited Conducting Coatings on Engineering and Commodity Resins

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122195D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Angelopoulos, M: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for obtaining conducting polymer coatings on a commodity or engineering resin material by electro-polymerizing an appropriate monomer system.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 63% of the total text.

Electrodeposited Conducting Coatings on Engineering and Commodity
Resins

      Disclosed is a method for obtaining conducting polymer
coatings on a commodity or engineering resin material by
electro-polymerizing an appropriate monomer system.

      Conducting materials are necessary to alleviate such problems
as electrostatic charge (ESC), electrostatic discharge (ESD), and
electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding.  Plastic materials are
more desirable than metal because of their lighter weight, lower
cost, design flexibility, easier processability, and freedom from
corrosion.  Plastic materials are generally rendered conducting with
the use of conducting fillers, metal coatings, or by conducting
paints.  These methods, however, are quite expensive and take away
most or all of the cost advantage of using plastic.

      In the following a method for depositing a conducting polymer
on to a commodity or engineering resin material by the
electro-polymerization of the starting monomer is described.  The
resin material chosen as an example is polycarbonate and the
conducting polymer is polyaniline (derived from the inexpensive
aniline monomer).  It is found that polycarbonate which has been
rendered partially conducting with the use of fillers, such as
graphite or stainless steel, can be used as an electrode to
electropolymerize aniline.  The cell consists of a Pt counter
electrode, an SCE (standard calomel electrode) as a reference, and
the conducting pol...