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Browse Prior Art Database

Flexible High-Quality Audio Delivery Via Infrared Link

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122197D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 3 page(s) / 162K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Glass, DW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed are flexible, modular approaches to providing high-quality stereo audio to the personal computer or workstation user. Included is a description of a novel PC-speaker in a chair implementation.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 38% of the total text.

Flexible High-Quality Audio Delivery Via Infrared Link

      Disclosed are flexible, modular approaches to providing
high-quality stereo audio to the personal computer or workstation
user.  Included is a description of a novel PC-speaker in a chair
implementation.

      As multimedia systems become more prevalent, full-range audio
signals will replace simple "beeps" as audio output from personal
computer systems.  The traditional audio speaker location within the
computer system unit will quickly be found inappropriate for delivery
of this type of audio.  Adding larger, higher-quality speakers to the
computer system is one approach; however, the volume required to
assure that adequate sound reaches the user will cause a nuisance
factor in the home or office environment. Obviously, alternate
methods for delivering high-quality audio to the computer user are
needed.

      Depending on the environment in which the computer system is
used, various approaches to delivering this sound may be appropriate.
For example, high-fidelity amplified speakers would be appropriate
where the computer is being used to present information to several
people in a meeting room, while use of such speakers in a typical
office environment would be intrusive, and headphones might be more
appropriate.  Because the use environment for a particular system
cannot be predicted in advance, a flexible approach to delivering
audio to the user is required.

      The approach disclosed here allows the use of a multitude of
delivery systems, including those mentioned above, all of which
receive audio information modulated by an infrared (IR) signal.
Versions of this approach may be built into a computer system or
added to an existing system.

      The basic approach used in all cases disclosed here is one in
which the audio signal from the host computer is modulated onto an IR
carrier.  The IR sending module is located in a convenient place,
such as atop the keyboard or CRT.  A variety of devices receive the
IR signal and demodulate it back to audio.

      Two implementations of the sender unit are disclosed. In the
first case, it is assumed that the host system has been designed with
existing audio-out jacks.  Here a standalone modulator unit is used.
A plug may be inserted into the audio source jack of the host
computer.  A cable brings the audio information into the unit body.
Within the body is modulating circuitry and an IR output diode.  A
lens diffuses the IR output omni-directionally.  The body may be
mounted on top of a CRT, keyboard, or system unit, as appropriate for
the particular system set-up.  Adapter plugs are provided to allow
simple adaptation to many jack styles, including mini-phone, phone,
and RCA cables.  The circuitry to implement such a sending unit is
commercially available. The circuitry may be powered by a battery or
AC adapter, or provisions may be made to allow a DC voltage to be
provided by the host computer...