Browse Prior Art Database

Side-Erase Data Recovery Procedure Using Data for Erase

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122236D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cunningham, EA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is an additional method of implementing a recovery procedure for magnetic recording storage devices described in U.S. Patent 4,516,165. The original patent described the elimination of adjacent track interference, using DC erase to trim the interference from each side of the track of interest, after storing the data from adjacent sectors elsewhere. The wording of the claims would also include a true AC erase. The additional method disclosed here describes a procedure where data frequencies can be used for the erasure.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Side-Erase Data Recovery Procedure Using Data for Erase

      Disclosed is an additional method of implementing a
recovery procedure for magnetic recording storage devices described
in U.S. Patent 4,516,165.  The original patent described the
elimination of adjacent track interference, using DC erase to trim
the interference from each side of the track of interest, after
storing the data from adjacent sectors elsewhere.  The wording of the
claims would also include a true AC erase.  The additional method
disclosed here describes a procedure where data frequencies can be
used for the erasure.

      This article allows the track pitch of the file to be reduced
without reducing the track width of the head, and without requiring a
DC erase or AC erase for the side-erase data recovery procedure.  The
erasure is accomplished using the normally strong interference of a
recorded data signal to cause an AC erase, by repetitively using the
very edge of a written track.  At the edge of the track, old recorded
information is erased, but the signal that is recorded has extremely
low resolution.

      First the data from each side sector is saved.  Each side
sector is then recorded at a high data frequency, with the head moved
inward toward the track of interest, so that the recording will erase
some or most of the offending interference from the track of
interest.  The head is then moved slightly away from the last
recording position, and a write is again done, which erases the last
recording, and leaves another width of a virtual AC erase further
out. This can be repeated until the head is backed up to the original
position of the side sec...