Browse Prior Art Database

Common Fixture Used for Head Suspension Assembly Inspection

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122256D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brooks, WW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

After a Head Suspension Assembly (HSA) has been assembled, it is inspected for critical parameters to monitor the part quality and to indicate trends which allow us to avoid making defective products. Our previous method of inspecting these critical parameters was to load and unload the HSA at each inspection station. This could mean loading and unloading each inspected HSA as many as 5 times, 10 handling steps in all. Each loading or unloading involves part handling and, therefore, exposes the HSA to a significant risk of damage.

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Common Fixture Used for Head Suspension Assembly Inspection

      After a Head Suspension Assembly (HSA) has been
assembled, it is inspected for critical parameters to monitor the
part quality and to indicate trends which allow us to avoid making
defective products.  Our previous method of inspecting these critical
parameters was to load and unload the HSA at each inspection station.
This could mean loading and unloading each inspected HSA as many as 5
times, 10 handling steps in all.  Each loading or unloading involves
part handling and, therefore, exposes the HSA to a significant risk
of damage.

      A method of HSA handling for inspection involving the use of a
Common Fixture is disclosed (see Fig. 1).

      Here is a list of advantages from using this method of handling
the HSA:
      -  Significantly reduces the contact handling of the HSA parts,
thereby reducing the damage caused by handling.
      -  The common fixture is easy to handle because it is large
enough to grasp by hand.  This helps speed the measurement process
and reduces operator fatigue.
      -  Substantially reduces test time, since the part is already
positioned on the common fixture.  Repetitive loading and unloading
steps are built into the common fixture, rather than being done at
each test station.
      -  Improves accuracy by simulating the actual swaging effect as
used in the actuator comb.  See Fig. 2 for details of this clamping
technique.
    ...