Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Workload Performance Measurement

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122264D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 3 page(s) / 82K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brown, LG: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

A workload on a general-purpose computing system can consist of a variety of work activities that may be running concurrently. Measuring the performance of workloads consisting of different work activities is an essential part of managing a computer system and networks of these systems.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Method for Workload Performance Measurement

      A workload on a general-purpose computing system can
consist of a variety of work activities that may be running
concurrently.  Measuring the performance of workloads consisting of
different work activities is an essential part of managing a computer
system and networks of these systems.

      Described is a method which provides the underlying system
capabilities that enable the measurement of workloads consisting of a
variety and combination of user and system work activities.

      For purposes of workload performance measurement, this
invention establishes the following concepts, which are shown in the
figure.
-  Work activity:  unique kinds of work.  In combination, a
collection of  work activities (Work Activity_1 through Work
Activity_n) make up a workload in a system.
-  Unit of work:  the basic unit that allows for performance measure
ment to occur.  A work activity is made up of units of work, where
units of work are specifically defined for each unique work activi
ty.
-  Unit of work boundaries:  the starting and ending points of a unit
of work
-  Interim points of performance interest:   performance measurement
points between the starting and ending points of a unit of work.
Examples include, but are not limited to, unit of work queueing time,
communication link-level response time for units of work that span
systems in a network.

      Given these concepts, applied to each unique work activity, it
is now possible to define and implement measures of workload
performance:
      -  Define units of work for each work activity
      -  Identify, within a system's code, the starting and endin...