Browse Prior Art Database

Accessing Remote Data Services Through an Object-Oriented Language

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122276D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 3 page(s) / 127K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chandler, PR: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes a methodology for accessing remote data services through the use of an object-oriented programming tool. This methodology provides a way to access remote data using an object-oriented paradigm, which will reduce the time and complexity involved in integrating with the service while increasing productivity.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 51% of the total text.

Accessing Remote Data Services Through an Object-Oriented Language

      This article describes a methodology for accessing remote
data services through the use of an object-oriented programming tool.
This methodology provides a way to access remote data using an
object-oriented paradigm, which will reduce the time and complexity
involved in integrating with the service while increasing
productivity.

      As the connectivity of the workstation expands, it is enabling
a truly cooperative processing between the workstation and host
environments and between workstations on remote local area networks.
The key to the cooperative processing environment is the availability
of services which can access data where ever it may reside. As this
environment gets more complex, so does the effort of writing
applications to take advantage of it.

      Writing in traditional languages such as 'C' or COBOL and using
traditional programming methodologies requires application developers
to understand the services. The usual interface into a service is a
control block. To use the service the application must initialize the
control block correctly for whatever function it is requesting of the
service and then also extract the needed information from the control
block which is returned from the service. Unfortunately, this
requires an application developer to understand each field of the
control block and when and how to initialize it, also which fields of
the returned control block are pertinent to the application.
Wrestling with this knowledge decreases the productivity of the
developer. Hiding the complexity of the service and allowing the
developer to treat the service as a black box would eradicate the
problem. Object-oriented programming is an excellent way of doing
just that.

      In an object-oriented programming environment, each object's
data is encapsulated within itself. The only way to get at an
object's data is to request the data from the object. In this manner
only that object must know where and how to get at its data, and no
other object needs to worry about it. Another characteristic of
object-oriented programming that can be taken advantage of is
inheritance. By writing the access method of a service generically as
a superclass, one can then create subclasses for each specific
service which will inherit its access methods from the superclass
(Fig. 1).

      The methodology for accessing remote data will involve creating
a class in the object-oriented environment for each of the control
blocks that are necessary to interface with the service. However,
that alone will not suffice, because now even though the control
block's data will be encapsulated and access to it regulated through
its methods, there is no intelligence to the obj...