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Methodology for Electronic Mail Negotiation of a Reply-After Time Period

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122290D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 55K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Vincent, JP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A requested reply-after date may be unacceptable.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 58% of the total text.

Methodology for Electronic Mail Negotiation of a Reply-After Time
Period

      A requested reply-after date may be unacceptable.

      Consider an electronic mail system where the sender of a
correspondence can request a range of dates when a response is
requested.  The earliest date of the range is called the "reply after
date". The latest date of the range is called the "due date." These
dates are entered by the sender of the correspondence and are shown
to each recipient of the correspondence. In current art, the
recipient must accept these dates or use telephone or independent
electronic mail correspondence to respond that one or both of the
dates is unacceptable.

      A better method is to allow negotiation of the reply-after and
due dates, using the electronic mail system. This method takes these
steps:
1) The sender of the correspondence indicates both reply-after and
due dates.
2) The proposed dates are added as tentative dates to the sender's
electronic calendar.
3) The date range is sent with the correspondence to the recipient.
4) The date range is shown to the recipient when he or she opens the
mail.
5) If the date range is acceptable, a notice to that effect is
returned to the sender, and the dates are added to his or her
electronic calendar.
6) If the dates are unacceptable, a reply is formulated back to the
sender with proposed alternative acceptable dates.  A record of the
proposed dates is kept as tentative dates in the sender's calendar.
7...