Browse Prior Art Database

Dual Vacuum Faraday Cage Apparatus for Measurements of Particle Charge and Mass

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122345D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dodds, C: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a dual Faraday cage design for the collection and measurement of charge and mass of toner particles. This tool incorporates two Faraday cages: one acting to collect the measured charge, and the other acting to shield the charge collection cage from stray external fields. This tool has the distinct advantage over previous vacuum lift-off tools of preventing stray external fields from influencing the measurement, therefore producing a much more accurate and repeatable result.

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Dual Vacuum Faraday Cage Apparatus for Measurements of Particle Charge
and Mass

      Disclosed is a dual Faraday cage design for the collection and
measurement of charge and mass of toner particles.  This tool
incorporates two Faraday cages: one acting to collect the measured
charge, and the other acting to shield the charge collection cage
from stray external fields.  This tool has the distinct advantage
over previous vacuum lift-off tools of preventing stray external
fields from influencing the measurement, therefore producing a much
more accurate and repeatable result.

      As shown in the figure, the dual Faraday cage uses a filter
cartridge to collect toner drawn into the cage through the tip.  The
use of a filter cartridge and the "slip-on" design of the dual cage
allow for quick filter changes.

      Another design feature of the dual cage is its use of screw-on
vacuum tips.  This allows the same cage design to be used to collect
data in a variety of applications. Depending on the geometry of the
toner-bearing surface, different tips are available or can be
fabricated as needed. Also shown in the figure is a general-purpose
"tube" tip that can be scanned across a surface to collect toner.

      Disclosed anonymously.