Browse Prior Art Database

Use of ARCAP in Gaskets and Conductive Paints

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122354D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Tophin, G: AUTHOR

Abstract

Large modern electronic machines (mainframes, communication controllers, etc.) usually are enclosed within a cabinet made of material (plastics, metals, etc.) coated with conductive paint, comprising doors so as to allow, when opened, maintenance access to electronic parts. Such a conductive frame is connected to the local ground potential in an effort to reduce radio frequency interference, electrostatic discharge susceptibility, and safety problems. In order not to ruin this effort, the electrical contact between fixed parts of the cabinet, and moving parts such as doors, must be of high quality when those doors are closed. A gasket such as the one shown in the figure is commonly used for that purpose: it consists of a wire mesh placed all around at the mechanical and electrical contact point between the doors and the cabinet.

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Use of ARCAP in Gaskets and Conductive Paints

      Large modern electronic machines (mainframes,
communication controllers, etc.) usually are enclosed within a
cabinet made of material (plastics, metals, etc.) coated with
conductive paint, comprising doors so as to allow, when opened,
maintenance access to electronic parts. Such a conductive frame is
connected to the local ground potential in an effort to reduce radio
frequency interference, electrostatic discharge susceptibility, and
safety problems. In order not to ruin this effort, the electrical
contact between fixed parts of the cabinet, and moving parts such as
doors, must be of high quality when those doors are closed. A gasket
such as the one shown in the figure is commonly used for that
purpose: it consists of a wire mesh placed all around at the
mechanical and electrical contact point between the doors and the
cabinet.

      So far, the wire mesh was most commonly made of copper
(possibly tinned), with a core having elastic qualities (such as an
inner stainless steel wire mesh, or an elastomer tube, etc.) so that
the gasket would not be deformed after many closings and openings of
the doors.  Conductive paints included particles of metal, such as
nickel.

      It has been demonstrated and is being disclosed here, that an
alloy commercialized under the brand name of ARCAP*, which is a
mainly 65% copper-25% nickel alloy, can be easily used to make up a
wire that can be woven into a mesh so as to real...