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Browse Prior Art Database

DekoVert I Program for Systrace Type Hooks

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122414D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 3 page(s) / 100K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bishop, DA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a program for converting a binary collection file into a universal, normalized data file for use by various post processors.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

DekoVert I Program for Systrace Type Hooks

      Disclosed is a program for converting a binary collection
file into a universal, normalized data file for use by various post
processors.

      Special groups of instructions, called hooks, are included at
key points in system and application programs in order to track
execution flow and thereby permit such activities as verification
testing and measurement of the efficiency of the program logic.  Each
hook has a unique identity (Major code and Minor code) distinguishing
it from all other hooks, and may or may not include key program
variables, symbols, file names, path names or return codes as data
items.

      The IBM OS/2* facility known as SYSTRACE provides means for
hooks to be generated, collected, and stowed in a wrap-a-round trace
buffer.  It also provides the TRACE program for turning hooks on or
off by Major code.  Once SYSTRACE begins processing a hook, it is
guaranteed there will be no interruption until the hook has been
completed.

      A small device driver was written which installs itself as a
patch atop the SYSTRACE facility to divert the data from the trace
buffer to the data bus where a "Device Under Test (DUT)" card is
plugged.  This DUT card is cable attached to a second card, a "Dekko
Data Collector (DDC)", which is plugged into a second machine acting
as a hardware monitor.  This second machine, in conjunction with a
collection program, receives each hook as a number of segments.  For
each segment, the program prepends a command byte, and appends a
two-byte time tag before recording the resulting record, called a
packet, to disk.

      The DUT card has several addresses to which data is written,
and the packet length depends upon whether the DUT address written to
was a "two-byte" address or a "four-byte" address.

      Bits in the command byte indicate whether the packet contains
two data bytes or four.  With the command byte and timer data
attached, the resulting packet lengths are then either five bytes or
seven bytes in length.

      The DDC has a two-byte timer, c...