Browse Prior Art Database

Low Temperature Etching Mask

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122438D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brady, MJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Fabrication of integrated circuits utilizing single crystal silicon is the choice of numerous semiconductor manufactures. As process temperatures are driven lower, the need for a low temperature etch mask is highly desirable. The prior art teaches techniques that allow for deposition of silicon dioxide (SiO2) which requires a high temperature, on the order of 1000oC. Another candidate, silicon nitride (Si3N4) deposited by Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) requires temperatures on the order of 350 to 450oC. These films, silicon nitride and silicon dioxide, serve as etch masks for preferential etching of silicon by chemical solutions such as aqueous Potassium Hydroxide (KOH) or mixtures of ethylenediamine (E), pyrocatechol (P), and water (W) (EPW).

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 78% of the total text.

Low Temperature Etching Mask

      Fabrication of integrated circuits utilizing single
crystal silicon is the choice of numerous semiconductor manufactures.
As process temperatures are driven lower, the need for a low
temperature etch mask is highly desirable. The prior art teaches
techniques that allow for deposition of silicon dioxide (SiO2) which
requires a high temperature, on the order of 1000oC.  Another
candidate, silicon nitride (Si3N4) deposited by Chemical Vapor
Deposition (CVD) requires temperatures on the order of 350 to 450oC.
These films, silicon nitride and silicon dioxide, serve as etch masks
for preferential etching of silicon by chemical solutions such as
aqueous Potassium Hydroxide (KOH) or mixtures of ethylenediamine (E),
pyrocatechol (P), and water (W) (EPW).

      Disclosed is an etch resistant mask that is defect-free, is a
low temperature process (on the order of 100oC), and can be patterned
utilizing standard lithography and semiconductor processing.  The
technique disclosed uses a Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition
(PACVD) to deposit diamond-like carbon films (DLC) on wafers at low
temperatures, as described in [*].  The films are both conformal and
nanoscale smooth as well as defect-free. Already after 100 Ao, the
DLC film is continuous and uniform, of low roughness (0.54 Ao).  The
roughness increases slightly for thicker films; nevertheless it
remains very low (1.28 Ao).  The films are impervious to both acids
as well as hot...