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Heuristic for Determining an Efficient Movement Path for a Two Axis Positioning System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122599D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Singletary, A: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for sequencing a large number of known coordinates in an XY plane such that a mechanical movement system may rapidly traverse a path which passes through each point. The method relies in part on exhaustive comparison of possible solutions and will not yield a mathematically optimal tour between the point. It does provide good results in the particular class of applications to be described.

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Heuristic for Determining an Efficient Movement Path for a Two Axis
Positioning System

      Disclosed is a method for sequencing a large number of
known coordinates in an XY plane such that a mechanical movement
system may rapidly traverse a path which passes through each point.
The method relies in part on exhaustive comparison of possible
solutions and will not yield a mathematically optimal tour between
the point.  It does provide good results in the particular class of
applications to be described.

      Many types of operations associated with electronic assembly
and other types of manufacturing require a mechanical positioning
system to move to a large number of predetermined locations in an XY
plane.  Determining a sequence of movements to accomplish this as
quickly as possible is an important and well known problem.  If the
positioning system must stop at each location, then this can be
treated as a travelling salesman problem, for which an analytical
solution has recently been discovered.  In some applications,
however, it is sufficient to pass through each set of coordinates
without stopping.

      An example is the application for which the method was
developed, in which measurement data is collected at a large number
of approximate locations on a printed circuit board. Each move of the
positioning system requires acceleration up to the maximum velocity
and deceleration to a stop.  In such a case, it is advantageous to
identify groups of locations through which the positioning system can
pass in a single move.  In this application, groups were identified
as collections of points lying in a line parallel to one of the axes
of motion.  In addition, a "distance threshold" was used to reject as
a group member any point which was not acceptably close to the other
members of the group. Calculation of an optimum distance threshold is
possible, gi...