Browse Prior Art Database

Routing Program for Engineering Verification Engine 2.0

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122601D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Myers, JD: AUTHOR

Abstract

A program is disclosed that routes bits through the different stages of hardware in an Engineering Verification Engine (EVE) 2.0.. The program uses bit maps to keep track of hardware facilities that are available to send a bit from one place to another within EVE.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Routing Program for Engineering Verification Engine 2.0

      A program is disclosed that routes bits through the
different stages of hardware in an Engineering Verification Engine
(EVE) 2.0..  The program uses bit maps to keep track of hardware
facilities that are available to send a bit from one place to another
within EVE.

      EVE is a special-purpose engine used to simulate a logic
design.  Bits from that design (representing arrays, latches or
simple logic) need to be routed for the purposes of Data Gather or
Breakpoints.  Data Gather is where the user asks that certain bits of
his design be saved throughout the simulation for later display and
analysis. These bits have to be routed to special Data Gather
hardware to be saved in large arrays for that purpose.  Breakpoints
are where the user asks that simulation stop when a certain
combination of signals occur.  Here, logic has to be added and the
signals routed to that logic so the combination can be detected and
simulation stopped.

      The figure shows a simplified flow of Second Level Routing.
The OIM (Output Instruction Memory) is one of the arrays that the
Router must "program".  During each sub-portion of a simulation cycle
(called a minor cycle, or MCC), a field from the OIM (a) is read out
and addresses one location in the (Data Output Memory) DOM (b).  The
bit that comes from the DOM is the bit we are trying to route.  The
router, in order to do this action, must look in the bit map for the
OIM and find an opening that corresponds to an unused location in the
OIM.  All locations up to a point, (called the High Water Mark or
HWM) have been used by Model Build and will not...