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In-situ Barrier Layer and Metallization Via Cvd

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122622D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Reynolds, S: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a process for sequential chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of barrier layer and metallization layer materials for on-chip wiring applications. Organometallic compounds of ruthenium and copper are used for the low-temperature deposition of a ruthenium barrier layer and a copper conductive layer. The depositions are performed in the same reactor without breaking vacuum.

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In-situ Barrier Layer and Metallization Via Cvd

      Disclosed is a process for sequential chemical vapor
deposition (CVD) of barrier layer and metallization layer materials
for on-chip wiring applications.  Organometallic compounds of
ruthenium and copper are used for the low-temperature deposition of a
ruthenium barrier layer and a copper conductive layer.  The
depositions are performed in the same reactor without breaking
vacuum.

      A CVD reactor was designed with a dual precursor inlet system,
thus allowing two different precursors to be loaded. The two parts of
the precursor inlet system are separated from each other and from the
reactor by valves.  Separate gas lines bubble carrier gas through the
precursor vessels and transport the vapor to the substrate surface.
The reactor is capable of handling a 125 mm wafer as a substrate.

      In one of the precursor vessels the organoruthenium compound
ruthenocene (C5H5)2Ru was loaded.  A mixed carrier gas (80% He, 20%
O2) was bubbled through the ruthenocene (held at 70~C) thus
transporting ruthenocene vapor to the wafer surface, which was held
at 300~C.  Deposition of pure ruthenium was observed to occur on
various surfaces (Cu, SiO2, TiSi).  By-products of the decomposition
were CO2 and water (1).

      After ruthenium layer deposition, the ruthenium precursor
vessel was valved shut, and helium carrier gas was bubbled through
the copper precursor.  As a copper precursor, we used any of a series...