Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Command Line User Interface Environment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122627D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 95K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Curry, SM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a user interface design that provides an alternative environment for executing command line programs. This user interface can also facilitate the creation, modification, and experimentation of batch files.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Command Line User Interface Environment

      Disclosed is a user interface design that provides an
alternative environment for executing command line programs. This
user interface can also facilitate the creation, modification, and
experimentation of batch files.

      Existing command line environments, such as the OS/2* windowed
or full-screen environments, provide users with a prompt from which
to enter and execute commands or programs. After hitting the Enter
key, the desired command or program will be executed, and if the
command or program directs its results to standard output channels,
the output will appear on the screen following the command.
Afterwards, the prompt will appear and the cycle will continue.
Unfortunately, this environment does not provide the user with an
easy way to run multiple commands and view multiple outputs; the user
can only see what hasn't scrolled outside of the environment's
screen.  An alternative way to execute and easily view the output of
command line programs, such as DIR, or programs whose output goes the
command line, like a C program with "Hello World!" going to standard
output, would have many advantages.

      The Command Line User Interface Environment (CLUIE) design
provides the user with additional flexibility to enter and modify
commands and view the output of these commands.  This user interface
consists of a window divided into two panes.  The edit pane occupies
the top half of the window and the output pane, the bottom half.
Both panes act like edit windows, allowing users to freely input,
modify and delete text; use the horizontal and vertical scroll bars;
and use the clipboard functions to copy, cut, and paste sections of
text.  The user can also save, clear, and print the contents of
either pane.  A menu bar below the window's title bar provides the
user with the commands described in this and the following
paragraphs.

      The user can enter commands in the edit pane, either one per
line or with a semicolon (or other delimiting character) at the end
of each command (thus allowing commands to be split across multiple
lines).  The chosen strategy depends upon the environment's
implementation, however, both strategies eliminate the need for
complex parsing routines that would red...