Browse Prior Art Database

Effective Set-up for Performing Phone Conversations by the Hearing Impaired

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122685D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 4 page(s) / 194K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gopalakrishnan, PS: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The hearing impaired can attempt to communicate over the telephone either using a Relay Service or an Automatic Speech Recognizer (ASR). Generally these conversations are performed as follows: 1. The hearing impaired person calls a relay service operator and communicates with him/her via a modem line using TDD device. In this set-up both the hearing impaired and a relay service operator communicate by typing their messages. 2. The relay service operator calls a hearing person with whom this hearing impaired person wants to speak. 3. After the third party is on the other end of the phone line the conversation between the hearing impaired and the hearing individual can be performed.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 33% of the total text.

Effective Set-up for Performing Phone Conversations by the Hearing
Impaired

      The hearing impaired can attempt to communicate over the
telephone either using a Relay Service or an Automatic Speech
Recognizer (ASR).  Generally these conversations are performed as
follows:
1.   The hearing impaired person calls a relay service operator and
communicates with him/her via a modem line using TDD device.  In this
set-up both the hearing impaired and a relay service operator
communicate by typing their messages.
2.   The relay service operator calls a hearing person with whom this
hearing impaired person wants to speak.
3.   After the third party is on the other end of the phone line the
conversation between the hearing impaired and the hearing individual
can be performed.  In this conversation the hearing impaired types
his messages to the relay service operator, the relay service
operator repeats these messages to the hearing person by voice, who,
in turn, answers by voice to the relay service operator.  These
answers are typed back to the hearing impaired.

      Some of relay services centers have Voice Carrier (VC). If the
hearing impaired has intelligible speech, the conversation with VC
can be performed as follows.

      First, the conversation is organized as it is described in the
first two items above.  Then when the third party is available the
hearing impaired person waits for a signal from the relay service
operator to the effect that he can start to speak with his own voice.
After the hearing impaired finishes speaking and lets the operator
know this, the operator hears the message from the hearing
individual, types this message to the hearing impaired and then again
lets him know that he can start to speak.

      Usually it takes 5-6 seconds between the end of typing a
message by the relay service operator and the moment that the hearing
impaired can start to speak.  This is because it takes some time for
the relay service operator to switch from one option (typing messages
to the hearing impaired) to another option (voice messages from the
hearing impaired.)

      Also in the current relay service centers with VC it usually
takes a few minutes for an operator to activate a voice carrier if
the hearing impaired requests it.

      The disadvantages of the VC set-up just described are the
following:
      1.   It is slow because of the following delays:
           a.   One has to wait for the operator to explain how the
conversation with the relay service set-up should be performed.
           b.   There are pauses caused by switching from the voice
message option to the character message option.
           c.   An average operator types slower than a person
speaks.  This problem is especially felt if the person speaks fast
over a phone.
      2.   The hearing impaired person cannot interrupt the other
person while he/she is speaking and vice...