Browse Prior Art Database

Method of Japanese Text Entry

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122688D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kozuru, Y: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes a new user interface in Japanese Kana-to-Kanji conversion (KKC) system. The method is to determine which part of entered text should be converted, when a user enters a Japanese text with mixed scripts of Hiragana, Katakana, and Roman characters.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 72% of the total text.

Method of Japanese Text Entry

      This article describes a new user interface in Japanese
Kana-to-Kanji conversion (KKC) system.  The method is to determine
which part of entered text should be converted, when a user enters a
Japanese text with mixed scripts of Hiragana, Katakana, and Roman
characters.

      According to this method,
 (1) If the text has Hiragana script, then convert Hiragana to
Kanji-Hiragana mixed text, and leave Katakana and Roman characters
unchanged.
 (2) If the text does not have Hiragana but has Katakana script, then
convert Katakana to Kanji-Hiragana mixed text, and leave Roman
characters unchanged.
 (3) If the text does not have Hiragana nor Katakana script, then
convert Roman characters to Kanji-Hiragana mixed text.

      The following two examples show input and output text of a KKC
system using this method.
[example-1] if entered text is made of single script:
   ("It's fine today." all in Hiragana)
   ("It's fine today." all in Katakana) < kyouhayoitenkidesu. >
   ("It's fine today" all in Roman characters)
They all will be converted into same Kanji-Hiragana mixed text, as
follows.
Note:  this is the same result as some of conventional KKC systems.
[example-2] if entered text is made of Hiragana, Katakana, and Roman
characters:
     ("I'll go to Hongkong from Shanghai tomorrow."
      "Hongkong" in Katakana, and "Shanghai" in Roman characters)
Only the Hiragana part is converted into Kanji-Hiragana mixed text...