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Provide a Personal Work Schedule in an Electronic Calendar

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000122706D
Original Publication Date: 1991-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 66K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Pringle, JM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article explains a change that should be made to electronic calendars in order to improve the group scheduling function.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Provide a Personal Work Schedule in an Electronic Calendar

      This article explains a change that should be made to
electronic calendars in order to improve the group scheduling
function.

      Current art provides users with the ability to share data
between electronic calendars on computer networks. Algorithms used to
find free time on shared electronic calendars assume that the person
is available (i.e., is not busy) if no item is scheduled during a
period of time.  This assumption is not valid if:
1.  the person's calendar being checked is working a different shift
than the person looking for free time, or
2.  the people whose calendars are being checked live in different
time zones (the free time found may be during a person's night).

      Current products do not provide an easy way for the user to
handle this problem.  The usual work around to which a user must
resort is to simply put items on their calendar during their
non-working hours.  For example:
    5:30pm  11:59pm  Not at work (evening to just before midnight)
   12:00am   8:30am  Not at work (midnight to morning)

      While this solves the problem, it is not a very elegant
solution for the following reasons:
-   The user has to create items for every day and replicate them
into the future.  If you change your mind later, you have to go track
down and change or delete many items. Depending on the sophistication
of the product being used, this can be a real hit to user
productivity.
-   Having these extra (and unwanted) items...